The Network Convenor for the Pacific Health Governance Research Network is Dr Owain Williams

The Co-Investigators are listed below.

Dr Owain Williams, Senior Research Fellow, School of Public Health UQ

Contact: o.williams@uq.edu.au

Profile: https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/12329

Dr Owain Williams is a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Queensland Public Health. He is an expert on the politics and political economy of health policy, and on intellectual property rights and access to medicines. He worked for the UNDP as a consultant on this area in 2014. He has published on access to medicines and global health governance, and new actors in health. His work includes, with Adrian Kay (eds.) Global Health Governance: Crisis, Institutions and Political Economy (Palgrave 2009); Partnerships and Foundations in Global Health Governance with Simon Rushton (eds.) (Palgrave 2011), New Political Economy of Pharmaceuticals in the Global South (Palgrave 2013); and The Transformation of Global Health Governance (Palgrave 2014). He manages a range of projects on testing with the Queensland Chair in HIV and STIs and works in the broad area of global health governance from a platform of community engagement. He is convener of the Pacific Health Governance workshop and Research Network.

Dr Colin Tukuitonga, Director General, the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC)

Dr Colin Tukuitonga has served as the Director-General of the SPC since January 2014. He is based at the organisation’s headquarters in Noumea, New Caledonia.

Dr Tukuitonga, from the Pacific Island of Niue, was formerly the Director of SPC’s Public Health Division. He was a member of an Independent External Review of SPC in 2012.

His previous roles include: Chief Executive Officer of the New Zealand Government’s Ministry of Pacific Island Affairs; Associate Professor of Public Health and Head of Pacific and International Health at the University of Auckland; Director of Public Health, New Zealand Ministry of Health; and Head of Surveillance and Prevention of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases at the World Health Organization, Switzerland.

Dr Tukuitonga has also served in various leadership and management roles, including at the Fiji School of Medicine, the Auckland District Health Board, Northern Regional Health Authority (Auckland), University of Auckland and the Health Research Council of New Zealand. He is a former Board member of the Pacific Cooperation Foundation.

Additionally, Dr Tukuitonga was a commissioner for the World Health Organization (WHO) global Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity from 2014 until its work concluded in early 2016.

Dr Tukuitonga is a Founding Member of the Niue Arts and Culture Festival, Pacific Language Weeks in New Zealand, and of the Leadership Development Programme for Pacific civil servants in New Zealand. He is a member of the Pacific Research panel for the Performance-Based Research Fund 2018 Quality Evaluation.

Dr Tess Newton Cain, Principle, TNC Pacific Consulting

Contact: tess@devpacific.org

Dr Tess Newton Cain is an independent researcher and consultant with over 20 years of experience in governance, policy and political analysis of the Pacific island region. Tess is an adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Queensland. She is a former Lecturer in Law at the University of the South Pacific and is a (dual) citizen of Vanuatu, where she lived 1997-2016.

Dr Nina Hall, UQ School of Public Health

Contact: n.hall2@uq.edu.au

Profile: https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/4151

Dr Nina Lansbury Hall is a researcher on environmental health within The University of Queensland’s School of Public Health. She conducts research and teaching on responses to complex issues around the sustainable and integrated development, including management and use of water and energy resources with social, environmental and economic considerations. This includes communicating water, renewable energy and health-relevant research findings into policy outcomes with stakeholders, which covers research on community engagement, behaviour change and policy analysis.

Her current research at UQ examines the implementation challenges and opportunities for the UN Sustainable Development Goals; and sustainable provision and evaluation of water, sanitation and hygiene in development, including in remote Indigenous communities on both mainland Australia and in the Torres Strait. She is also investigating the impacts of climate change on human and environmental health. This involves a role as lead author on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (WG II, AR6).

Nina has worked on environmental and social sustainability issues in research and non-government organisations and she is motivated by an aim to create and contribute to high-impact research that responds to complex or ‘wicked’ environmental and social challenges in Australia and globally. Within the research sector, she was previously a senior research scientist at CSIRO, manager of the Sustainable Water program at The University of Queensland, and senior research consultant at the Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS. Within the non-government sector, she was the director of the Climate Action Network Australia and research coordinator at the Mineral Policy Institute.

Professor Karen Hussey, Director, Centre for Policy Futures UQ

Contact: k.hussey@uq.edu.au

Profile: https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/13267

Professor Karen Hussey is a leading Australian researcher in the field of public policy and governance, particularly in the areas of sustainable development, environmental policy and international trade.

Trained as a political scientist and economist, Karen has a unique breadth and depth of research and policy engagement experience, having conceived, designed, conducted and delivered cutting edge social science research focused a range of sectors - including climate change mitigation and adaptation, water, energy, waste, urban management, critical infrastructure, international trade, and biotechnology in the health system - enabling a rare competence to achieve a comparative perspective on policy and governance issues. She has led the development of innovative intellectual and policy approaches to sustainability and risk, combining traditional disciplinary expertise with a close understanding of the particular attributes of policy problems.

Associate Professor Matt McDonald, School of Political Science and International Studies, UQ

Contact: matt.mcdonald@uq.edu.au

Profile: https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/634

Matt McDonald is Associate Professor of International Relations in the School of Political Science and International Studies at UQ. His research is in the area of critical approaches to security, and in particular the relationship between security and environmental change. His recent work exploring the regional security implications of climate change is of direct relevance to this research area. He is the author of Security, the Environment and Emancipation (Routledge, 2012) and co-author of Ethics and Global Security (Routledge, 2014), and is co-editor of Australian Journal of Politics and History.

Professor Mark Moran, Professor, Institute for Social Science Research UQ

Contact: mark.moran@uq.edu.au

Profile: https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/1093

Professor Mark Moran took up the position of Professor in Development Effectiveness at the Institute for Social Science Research in April 2013. He is closely affiliated with the Aboriginal Environment Research Centre. His career spans across academia, nonprofit, government and consultancy.

Professor Moran has worked in Indigenous and international development contexts, including Aboriginal Australia, Native America, Bolivia, China, Papua New Guinea, Timor Leste and Lesotho. He has broad range of research and practical experience in development, including governance, public finance management, participation, community planning, social housing, water and sanitation. He is an experienced project manager, including institutional analysis and stakeholder management in complex and politicised contexts. His research interests are focused on the science of development effectiveness, toward forging new collaborations between academia and development practice.

Dr Karen McNamara, UQ Centre for Policy Futures

Contact: karen.mcnamara@uq.edu.au

Profile: https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/2938

Karen is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences at The University of Queensland (UQ). As a development geographer, Karen undertakes research into the impacts of, and responses to, environmental change on people’s livelihoods, particularly in the Pacific Islands region and parts of Asia. Karen has been undertaking research in this area for over fifteen years, partnering with numerous governments, and intergovernmental and non-government organisations throughout the Asia-Pacific region.

Currently, Karen is lead Chief Investigator on the ARC Linkage project ‘Optimising community-based climate change adaptation in the Pacific Islands’, and Chief Investigator on National Geographic project ‘Navigating rising seas: a comparative study of relocation in Fiji, the Maldives and Tuvalu’. She has undertaken a number of research projects for the Australian Government, European Union, United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, and others. She currently supervises 10 PhD students, and is a member of the United Nations University’s ‘Resilience Academy’, Integrated Research on Disaster Risk’s ‘Young Scientists Programme’, and an Associate with the Queensland Centre for Population Research (UQ).

Prior to taking up her position at UQ, Karen was a Research Consultant at the University of the South Pacific based in Fiji (2011-2012). From 2008-2011, Karen was based in Cairns at James Cook University managing major research projects in the Wet Tropics rainforest and Torres Strait for the Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility and National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility. Prior to this, Karen worked for the NSW Government (2007) and in various roles at the University of New South Wales (2002-2006).

Dr Fiona Charlson

Contact: fiona_charlson@qcmhr.uq.edu.au

Profile: http://qcmhr.uq.edu.au/research/group-leaders/fiona-charlson/

Dr Fiona Charlson is a psychiatric epidemiology and health services researcher with a strong commitment to and experience in the development of mental health services, systems and policy in low- and middle-income countries.

Dr Charlson currently leads the Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research’s Mental Health and Development Group where she holds ongoing collaborations with and provides technical expertise to national and international partners, including: the World Health Organization, Fiji National University, Clinton Health Access Initiative, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, US National Institutes of Health, Alan Flisher Centre for Public Mental Health (University of Cape Town), the China-India Alliance for Mental Health, and various other low- and middle-income country partners. She is also a core member of the Mental Disorders and Illicit Drug Use Research Group for the Global Burden of Disease Studies. A current flagship project is a collaboration with the World Health Organisation to develop protocols for measuring the progress of mental health-related Sustainable Development Goals.

Dr Charlson has completed a Masters in International Public Health and a PhD on the epidemiological modelling of mental disorders in conflict-affected populations. Her original training was as a pharmacist and she has 18 years’ experience, including work as a community pharmacist in Australia and New Zealand, project pharmacist for Medecins Sans Frontieres’ in West Africa, and a referral pharmacist for Medecins Sans Frontieres’ ‘Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines’ in Geneva, Switzerland.

Dr Charlson has ongoing teaching commitments including as course coordinator for Mental Health Across the Globe (PUBH7026) delivered annually at The University of Queensland’s School of Population Health, and the Leadership in Mental Health Course delivered biannually to Pacific Island delegates.

Associate Professor Peter Hill

Contact: p.hill@sph.uq.edu.au

Profile: https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/398

Peter Hill is Associate Professor, Global Health Systems in the School of Public Health at The University of Queensland. His research and teaching interests currently focus on global health governance, heath in the Sustainable Development Goals, health systems strengthening and Indigenous health in Australia. He is a Public Health Physician by training and a member of the National Council of the Royal Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine.

He completed his PhD at the Vrije Universiteit Brussels, examining the emergence of global health policy and its translation into country level policies and program. He has been principal investigator in a series of projects that have examined the development of the health goal in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the uptake of the Indigenous Burden of Disease Research findings into policy in Australia, and health services provision in fragile and conflict-affected states. He has undertaken research in Fiji examining governance for leptospirosis control, and the reporting demands of the SDGs. Given the depth of his scholarship—both in teaching and research—on the SDGs and their importance for the Pacific, this is likely to be the focus of his future collaborations with SPC.

He has extensive research and health systems experience across West Africa, South East Asia and the Pacific – with particular focus on Nigeria, Cambodia, Vietnam, Papua New Guinea and Aboriginal Australia, undertaking consultancies for AusAID, GIZ, Australian Red Cross, the GAVI Alliance, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria and the World Health Organization.

Associate Professor Damien Hine

Contact: D.Hine@business.uq.edu.au

Profile: https://www.business.uq.edu.au/staff/damian-hine

Damian Hine is an evolutionary economist focussed on innovations that enhance firm growth, community and economic development.  At the core of Damian’s work is the creation, development and uptake of new ideas and technologies and changes in business models needed to support them. His major research theme focuses on the organisational capabilities required to drive change processes. His research employs novel quantitative modelling techniques on large data sets, as well as community level interventions aimed at increasing the innovativeness of businesses, communities and industries. 

His work on biotechnology innovation has been published in Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, Trends in Biotechnology, and Health Affairs. Damian has also published commissioned national and international reports on Australia’s Biotechnology industry competitiveness; advanced manufacturing opportunities in Asia; and the future of the biotechnology industry for the OECD. Recent international projects include the World Bank funded Capturing Coral Reef Ecosystem Services (CCRES), the Chinese National Natural Science Foundation project on business model innovation; collaborations with Harvard Medical School on the impact of regulation on drug development; and with Stanford’s ChangeLabs on the Sustainable Development Goals. Damian is the UQ lead in the Rural Economies Centre of Excellence, focussed on the economics of innovation in Queensland’s regions; and is leading a CRC for Northern Australia funded project on market opportunities for novel horticultural products in key Asian markets. His focus on innovation has also led to his extensive leadership of innovation and commercialisation programs and initiatives.

Damian’s skills are built around the innovation and change process, with extensive experience across multiple SDGs. He has extensive experience leading interdisciplinary projects.

Mark Power

Contact: mark.power@abtassoc.com.au

Profile: https://au.linkedin.com/in/markpower1977

Mark is an experienced Technical Manager and Knowledge Management Specialist with over 17 years’ experience across international and Australian-based health programs.

Mark has managed and overseen many high profile programs in the Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Australia and the broader Pacific region. He has skills and experience in management, research, public health and economics with a detailed knowledge of innovative evaluation methodologies and approaches.

In his current role as Head of Australian Programs & Knowledge Management at Abt Associates, Mark uses evidence and best practice to improve technical and operational quality, effectiveness and efficiency.

Associate Professor Linda Selvey

Contact: l.selvey@uq.edu.au

Profile: https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/16689

Associate Professor Linda Selvey joined the School of Public Health as a Teaching and Research Academic in January 2017.  She is a public health physician and her main research area is in the field infectious diseases epidemiology and control. Her research interests relate to implementation of responses to diverse health challenges including: climate change; food borne disease; sexual health; blood borne viruses and antimicrobial resistance.

A/Prof Selvey formerly worked for Queensland Health, starting there as Director of Communicable Diseases Branch in December 1996 and in 2005, was then promoted to Executive Director, Population Health Queensland. She remained in this position until moving to Sydney where she took up the position of CEO of Greenpeace Australia Pacific. A/Prof Selvey then moved to Perth to join her partner and worked at Curtin University, School of Public Health, before joining The University of Queensland.

Lana Elliot

Contact: lana.elliott@qut.edu.au

Profile: http://staff.qut.edu.au/staff/elliotl2/

Ms Lana Elliott is a lecturer in the School of Public Health and Social Work, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology.

Ms Elliott completed her Masters in International Public Health at The University of Sydney, after having completed a Bachelor of Arts (Global) majoring in Human Rights and International Studies at Monash University. Lana has worked in various capacities in health management, public health & development in various contexts both in Australia and abroad, informing her research interest in the impact of policy on community health outcomes.

Since joining QUT, she has focused on the design and delivery of health planning & evaluation and global health policy courses that reflect and are informed by her research and experience.

Dr Gavin Macgregor Skinner

Contact: Gavin_MacgregorSkinner@abtassoc.com

Profile: http://abtassociates.com/About-Us/Our-People/Associates/Gavin-Macgregor-Skinner.aspx

Gavin Macgregor-Skinner, a nationally-recognized authority on global threats from infectious disease, is Abt Associates’ senior global health security advisor. In this role he works with colleagues at Abt to address such questions as:  How does a government strengthen and sustain its core public health capacities, as demanded by the International Health Regulations? What counts as a global health security concern? In the context of governance of global health, how to distil and translate lessons learned from other programs?

Gavin has more than 20 years of technical experience in infectious disease surveillance and response. He has worked on these issues with U.S. and international governments, United Nations agencies, and the private sector in the U.S., Africa, Asia, Middle East, and Latin America. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences at Penn State Hershey College of Medicine and has appeared on CNN, BBC, CTV, C-SPAN, and other news outlets to share his expertise in global health threats.

He has expertise in: infectious disease outbreaks and responses; strategic planning and analysis; stakeholder engagement and outreach; capacity building and organisational change management; and program management, monitoring and evaluation.

Dr Carol Farbotko

Contact: carol.farbotko@csiro.au

Profile: https://people.csiro.au/F/C/Carol-Farbotko

Carol Farbotko is a research scientist at the CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences. Her research on climate change and displacement issues in the Pacific Islands commenced in 2004 and covers cultural and social issues facing atoll populations particularly in Tuvalu, as well as more recent work focussing on community relocation planning across the Pacific, and an examination of the phenomenon of voluntary immobility in a changing climate. She is interested in collaborating with health researchers to develop transdisciplinary methodologies to better understand and address “existential insecurity” associated with potential displacement across individual, community and national scales.

Professor Bill Belloti

Profile: https://gci.uq.edu.au/professor-bill-bellotti

Professor Bill Bellotti has more than 30 years' experience in leading agricultural production system research in southern Australia, western China, and eastern India.

His expertise includes agronomy, climate variability and change, farming systems and integrated approaches to food systems. Professor Bellotti's research in China and India has focussed on sustainability and food security, and more recently on the linkages between diversification of cropping systems, dietary diversity and empowerment of women farmers.

His research interests include the application of Life Cycle Assessment approaches to Australian food systems. This interest includes the development of concepts such as sustainable diets and food footprints. At the Global Change Institute he looks forward to engaging the diversity of views and expertise across the University of Queensland and other stakeholders to promote healthier, sustainable and equitable food systems.

Dr Samid Suliman

Contact: s.suliman@griffith.edu.au

Profile: https://app.griffith.edu.au/phonebook/phone-details.php?type=B&id=1673905

Samid Suliman is Lecturer in Migration and Security in the School of Humanities, Languages and Social Science at Griffith University. He is also a member of the Griffith Centre for Social and Cultural Research. Dr Suliman is an interdisciplinary researcher interested in migration, security, postcolonial political theory, international relations and world politics, global development, climate change, and the politics of knowledge.

Dr Suliman was awarded the Australian Political Studies Association’s 2015 Thesis Prize for his doctoral thesis, entitled ‘Migration, Development and Kinetic Politics’ (this is currently being revised for publication as a monograph). His work has recently appeared in Review of International Studies, Globalizations, and Mobilities. He is currently developing a project exploring challenges to, and opportunities for, effective regional migration governance in Oceania in the context of a changing climate. This aligns closely with the SPC’s strategic interest in the intersections between climate change, public health and human security.

Dr Claire Brolan

Dr Claire E Brolan (PhD, MA, LLB (Hons), BA) is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Policy Futures (UQ), having recently completed her Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, The University of Toronto. For the past seven years, Claire’s research undertaken at UQ, The University of Melbourne, and The University of Toronto has specifically focused on UN Member State and community engagement, and now country implementation of, global health in the context of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Agenda.

Claire has nearly 30 peer-reviewed and other publications broaching the SDGs (including in the Medical Journal of Australia, The Lancet, BMJ Global Health) and is particularly committed to intersectional and intersectoral health and development change innovation -  essential for country achievement of the 17 SDGs and the cross-cutting Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 in the Asia and Pacific region. Therefore, Claire tackles complex global health and development policy, governance and right to health challenges by applying a mix of interdisciplinary research techniques and analytical approaches that draw on her extensive international law, global health policy, social science (qualitative research), biomedical, as well as health and human rights education, training, and in–the-field experience.

Amy Savage

Contact: amy.savage@uqconnect.edu.au 

Amy Savage is an early-career researcher with over 8 years of experience in the international development sector and is currently working in climate change and health as a consultant for the World Health Organization. Amy has also held roles at the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) and in the private sector working on the Australian Aid Program including three years on the DFAT-funded Civil Society Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Fund. 

Her previous research includes nutrition education programs in Indonesia with a particular focus on adolescent females.  She is currently undertaking a PhD investigating the impacts of climate change on food and nutrition security and diet-related non-communicable diseases in Vanuatu.  She is Assistant Investigator for the WASH team of the Pacific Health Governance workshop and Research Network.  Her research interests include climate change and health, NCDs and WASH with a focus on the Pacific region.

Melanie Wratten